JALT 2015 Presentation Accepted!

My submission to speak at the 2015 JALT National Conference in November passed the vetting committee!

I’ll be presenting on effective classroom monitoring techniques.

Day: Monday ( November 23rd)
Time:  12:45 PM – 1:10 PM (25 minutes)
Room: 910

The details are as follows:

Short Summary

Monitoring is more than just providing corrective feedback on linguistic errors. The presenter will outline a framework that combines the key functions of classroom monitoring, describing a cycle of actions centring on critical listening and questioning of students. Participants will receive insights into the practical and purposeful nature of monitoring, making ‘walk around’ time a key juncture in conceptualising the move from being ‘the sage on the stage’ to ‘the guide by the side’.

Abstract

Teachers have direct contact with students during the time they walk around the classroom while monitoring. Effective teachers use this ‘walk around’ time better, and in general education, there are many ideas about how monitoring can help create an ideal classroom environment (see for example, Cotton, 1988). Presenting transparent learning outcomes is a cornerstone of expert teaching (Hattie, 2008).  In EFL, teachers utilise many techniques of making learning visible to students, one of which is to monitor learner output as a primary resource of information concerning the degree to which success or failure occurs in language learning (Ellis et. al., 2005). Although providing corrective feedback during EFL monitoring is recognised as an effective methodology (Fujii 2013), corrective feedback is often limited to the linguistic domain (see for example, Mori, 2002). Yet monitoring has many more purposes, and to date, there is not a unified theory of classroom monitoring that encompasses its various functions.

Truly focusing on the learner during monitoring requires a wider skill set. The presenter will outline a framework that combines the key functions of classroom monitoring. This framework describes a cycle of actions that uses critical listening and questioning of students. Novice teacher participants will receive significant insights into the practical and purposeful nature of monitoring, making ‘walk around’ time a key juncture in conceptualising the move from being ‘the sage on the stage’ to ‘the guide by the side’.

About theCaledonian

Scot living in north Japan teaching at a national university.
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