Category Archives: learning theory

Edev_502 response wk8_3

Thanks for your highly informative response. I’m glad that you recognise some element of ideology in your belief system. Until there are convincing arguments, most of our actions will have some kind of ideological basis. I’d like to highlight this … Continue reading

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Edev_502 response wk8_1

Minimally guided instruction can be a very powerful learning tool. However, its use may need to be mediated by an understanding of its functional weaknesses in the particular learning environment. Tim Murphey (2003) describes three teacher modes in the move … Continue reading

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Edev_502 wk8

The focus this week moved over to the social aspects of learning. The traditional view that learning occurs in the mind of an individual only has been fundamentally challenged by social learning theories that posit that the environment not only … Continue reading

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Edev_502 response wk7_4

I enjoyed your post tremendously. Not only is your actual writing a model of excellence, you succinctly and clearly expressed many of the points I had engaged with this past week. Like many, you reject labelling and argue for more … Continue reading

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Edev_502 wk7

[Note: there was no discussion in week 6.] Learner differences was the topic for this week’s discussion. This was the time to investigate the shady underbelly of the education business. Names are made on the back of ideas that may … Continue reading

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Edev_502 response wk5_5

Thanks for sending the link to Nimblekits (2008) article. I like the author’s observation that, “Learning happens all the time, over the whole career of the student”. Lave and Wenger (1991) expound their theory that learning is situated, that is, … Continue reading

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Edev_502 response wk5_4

I enjoyed your post and your strong recommendation to challenge students to develop their thinking skills. Partly because I try the same myself, partly because it feels like an educator-ly type of duty and partly because I believe that encouraging … Continue reading

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Edev_502 wk4

This week, our focus was directed onto habit formation and onto how habits influence education in particular. Before reading the required literature for the week, I was ambivalent about habits: they were either good/ bad or teachers could try to … Continue reading

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Edev_502 response wk3_2

I always appreciate your excellent summaries of the week’s reading. When you wrote: The type of approach taken will also depend on the subject matter, as Meyer & Land (2006) argue that threshold concepts are perhaps more identifiable in the … Continue reading

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Edev_502 response wk3_1

Thanks for your questions. I thought about Meyer and Land’s interrelatedness containing the notion of derivation, reckoning intuitively, it must. However, their explanation does not clarify the matter; they don’t go beyond inter-relations. I surveyed a dozen articles that discuss … Continue reading

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